Choose another country or region to see content specific to your location.

Blog

Company News

The latest dirt on tech cleaning [Infographic]

Posted on 17 April 2014 by the AF Team
Category: Education, Fun

We live in a world where every day we find ourselves awash with information, the office and workplace in particular is an environment filled with a constant stream of facts and statistics. With this in mind here at AF we’ve created an infographic that’s a little more engaging, with the purpose of highlighting your dirty little secrets and questioning just how healthy your working week really is...

An infographic showing the latest results from a poll that AF International conducted to find out more about office hygiene and tech cleaning

Tech Cleaning – Key Points

A lot of workplace tech items are not being properly cleaned

  • One in six workers (17%) never clean their workplace tech items
  • Only 16% of workers clean their workplace tech items every day
  • Over a third of workers (36%) never have their workplace tech items cleaned by a third-party cleaner
  • Men are more likely than women to get their workplace tech items cleaned at least once a week, both by themselves (47% vs. 33%) and by a third-party cleaner (42% vs. 28%)

Older workers (45 and over) are less likely than younger workers (18 to 44) to have their workplace tech items cleaned by a third-party cleaner (53% vs. 73%)

  • Only a third of workers (35%) have cleaning products supplied by their employer to use to clean their workplace tech items
  • 14% of workers’ employers use a specialist company to clean workplace tech products
  • The most common products supplied are cleaning cloths (70%), spraydusters (51%) and phone wipes (50%)

Many people are not cleaning their personal tech items properly

  • Almost half (42%) clean their personal mobile phone by wiping the screen with their sleeve
  • This is even more common among women than men (48% vs. 36%)
  • A similar number use a phone cleaning wipe (28%) or specialist cleaning cloth (13%)
  • Men are more likely than women to use both phone cleaning wipes (32% vs. 24%) and specialist cleaning cloths (15% vs. 11%)
  • These are usually used a couple of times a week (57% and 37%)
  • Men are more likely to use specialist cleaning cloths every day than women are (39% vs. 10%)
  • Overall 85% of people clean their personal mobile phone
  • Young people (18 to 24) are the most likely to clean their personal mobile phone (92% vs. 83%)
  • The most common equipment for cleaning personal tech items is a duster (33%) or a duster with polish (19%)
  • Laptops are the most likely to be cleaned with specialist cleaning wipes (21%), followed by tablet computers (20%) and desktop computers (20%)
  • Men are more likely than women to use specialist cleaning wipes across every personal tech item
  • Microfibre cloths are used particularly for tablet computers (22%) and cameras (21%)
  • Antibacterial wipes are also used, especially for desktop phones (16%)

A lot of people eat at work

  • Half eat breakfast at work (50%)
  • Most either eat lunch at their desk (42%) or in a designated eating area (37%)
  • Under half manage to take a lunch break away from their desk every day (45%)
  • Women are less likely than men to take lunch away from their desk every day (41% vs. 50%) are more likely to never take lunch away from their desk (13% vs. 8%)
  • Popular alternatives for lunch breaks include going out into town (21%), sitting in a park (20%) and checking social networks (18%)
  • Women are more likely than men to enjoy going out into town (26% vs. 17%) and going food shopping (14% vs. 7%) during their lunch break the
  • The younger the age group, the more likely they are to check their social networks or play a game on their mobile phone during their break
  • By far the favourite lunchtime food is sandwiches (60%), followed distantly by soup (11%)
  • Sandwiches are most popular among men (66%) and older people (55 to 60) (68%)

Consumers own a wide variety of tech items

  • Laptops are the most popular type of personal computer (82%), well ahead of tablet computers (54%) and desktop computers (53%)
  • Most of them are used every day
  • Women are more likely than men to own a laptop (85% vs. 78%) but less likely to own a desktop computer (45% vs. 61%)
  • Over half of workers (54%) use a desktop computer for work
  • A third of consumers (34%) own an e-reader
  • Most workplaces own a fax machine (64%) …
  • … but half of workers with one (52%) haven’t used it within the last month
  • Widely-owned consumer electronics items include digital cameras (74%), games consoles (54%) and MP3 players (51%)
  • But frequency of use is the reverse, with 26% using the MP3 player every day, down to 19% every day use of games consoles and 6% every day use of digital cameras
  • Digital camera ownership increases with age, to 86% among older people (55 to 60)
  • Games consoles are most used by men (59%) and young people (18 to 24) (63%)
  • Android mobile phones (49%) are more widely owned than Apple mobile phones (36%)
  • Apple’s position is stronger among younger consumers (18 to 34) (45%) than among older consumers (35 to 60) (30%), but Android mobile phones are used equally across all age groups
  • Almost everyone uses their mobile phone every day (Android 87%, Apple 91%)
  • 41% of workers use their personal mobile for work, and 21% use a work mobile
  • Texting (45%) and talking to people (33%) are both popular primary phone activities
  • There is a gender gap: women are more likely than men to text primarily (56% vs. 33%) and miss texting most (54% vs. 29%) but are less likely to talk to people primarily (24% vs. 42%) and miss making calls most (22% vs. 35%)
  • Consumers spend an average of 2.2 hours per day on their phone
  • This rises to 3.4 hours per day among young people (18 to 24)
  • Only half of people (51%) would go back and get their phone if they left it at work
  • This rises to 62% of young people (18 to 24)